Eating Vegetables Does Not Protect Against Cardiovascular Disease



Lifestyle Desk, Barta24.com
Photo: Collected

Photo: Collected

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A long-term ‘UK Biobank’ study on almost 400,000 people finds little or no evidence that differences in the amount of consumed cooked or uncooked vegetables affects the risk of cardiovascular disease. When known socio-economic and lifestyle confounding factors are corrected for, the small apparent positive effect that remains could likely also be explained away by further confounders.

A sufficient intake of vegetables is important for maintaining a balanced diet and avoiding a wide range of diseases. But might a diet rich in vegetables also lower the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD)? Unfortunately, researchers from the Nuffield Department of Population Health at the University of Oxford, the Chinese University of Hong Kong, and the University of Bristol found no evidence for this.

That the consumption of vegetables might lower the risk of CVD might at first sight seem plausible, as their ingredients such as carotenoids and alpha-tocopherol have properties that could protect against CVD. But so far, the evidence from previous studies for an overall effect of vegetable consumption on CVD has been inconsistent.

Now, new results from a powerful, large-scale new study in 'Frontiers in Nutrition' shows that a higher consumption of cooked or uncooked vegetables is unlikely to affect the risk of CVD. They also explain how confounding factors might explain previous spurious, positive findings.

“The UK Biobank is a large-scale prospective study on how genetics and environment contribute to the development of the most common and life-threatening diseases. Here we make use of the UK Biobank’s large sample size, long-term follow-up, and detailed information on social and lifestyle factors, to assess reliably the association of vegetable intake with the risk of subsequent CVD,” said Prof Naomi Allen, UK Biobank’s chief scientist and co-author on the study.

The UK Biobank, follows the health of half a million adults in the UK by linking to their healthcare records. Upon their enrollment in 2006-2010, these volunteers were  interviewed about their diet, lifestyle, medical and reproductive history, and other factors.

The researchers used the responses at enrollment of 399,586 participants (of whom 4.5% went on to develop CVD) to questions about their daily average consumption of uncooked versus cooked vegetables. They analyzed the association with the risk of hospitalization or death from myocardial infarction, stroke, or major CVD. They controlled for a wide range of possible confounding factors, including socio-economic status, physical activity, and other dietary factors.

Crucially, the researchers also assessed the potential role of ‘residual confounding’, that is, whether unknown additional factors or inaccurate measurement of known factors might lead to a spurious statistical association between CVD risk and vegetable consumption.

The mean daily intake of total vegetables, raw vegetables, and cooked vegetables was 5.0, 2.3, and 2.8 heaped tablespoons per person. The risk of dying from CVD was about 15% lower for those with the highest intake compared to the lowest vegetable intake. However, this apparent effect was substantially weakened when possible socio-economic, nutritional, and health- and medicine-related confounding factors were taken into account. Controlling for these factors reduced the predictive statistical power of vegetable intake on CVD by over 80%, suggesting that more precise measures of these confounders would have explained away any residual effect of vegetable intake.

Dr Qi Feng, a researcher at the Nuffield Department of Population Health at the University of Oxford, and the study’s lead author, said: “Our large study did not find evidence for a protective effect of vegetable intake on the occurrence of CVD. Instead, our analyses show that the seemingly protective effect of vegetable intake against CVD risk is very likely to be accounted for by bias from residual confounding factors, related to differences in socioeconomic situation and lifestyle.”

Dr Feng suggests that future studies should further assess whether particular types of vegetables or their method of preparation might affect the risk of CVD.

Last author Dr Ben Lacey, an associate professor in the Nuffield Department of Population Health, concluded: “This is an important study with implications for understanding the dietary causes of CVD and the burden of CVD normally attributed to low vegetable intake. However, eating a balanced diet and maintaining a healthy weight remains an important part of maintaining good health and reducing risk of major diseases, including some cancers. It is widely recommended that at least five portions of a variety of fruits and vegetables should be eaten every day.”

Drinking Tea Could Lower Risk of Diabetes, Stroke



News Desk, Barta24.com
Drinking Tea Could Lower Risk of Diabetes, Stroke

Drinking Tea Could Lower Risk of Diabetes, Stroke

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Several recent studies have suggested that drinking several cups of tea per day could lower the risk of diabetes, heart disease, and stroke.

The latest study indicates that drinking four cups of black, green, or oolong tea per day can lower the risk of developing type 2 diabetes by 17% over a decade. The research will be presented next week at the European Association for the Study of Diabetes annual conference.

“Our results are exciting because they suggest that people can do something as simple as drinking four cups of tea a day to potentially lessen their risk of developing type 2 diabetes,” Xiaying Li, a researcher at Wuhan University of Science and Technology, told NBC News.

Li and colleagues reviewed 19 studies, which included more than 1 million adults across 8 countries. They found that the benefits of drinking tea went up as someone drank more cups. For one to three cups per day, for instance, the risk of type 2 diabetes dropped by 4%. The percentages increased from there.

In another study published last month, researchers found that drinking two or more cups of black tea per day lowered the overall risk of death by 9% to 13% among 498,000 people in the U.K. during a 14-year period, as compared with those who drank no tea. The study also found a link between drinking multiple cups of tea per day and a lower risk of heart disease and stroke.

“We think our findings will be very reassuring to people who are already drinking tea,” Maki Inoue-Choi, PhD, a staff scientist at the National Cancer Institute, told NBC News.

Even among those who drank more than 10 cups of tea per day, “we didn’t see any negative effects on mortality risk,” she said.

The health benefits could stem from the polyphenols in tea, which are natural compounds in plants that provide antioxidants and may decrease inflammation, Inoue-Choi noted. Reducing inflammation can lower the risk of developing health conditions such as heart disease.

In green tea, the dominant polyphenols are called catechins, which can protect cells from damage, NBC News reported. When green tea leaves are fermented to make black tea, the catechins convert to theaflavins, which provide another form of antioxidants.

Inoue-Choi said she and colleagues found that adding milk or sugar to tea didn’t reduce the health benefits. But she noted that the participants tended to use those ingredients sparingly.

“The sweetened tea from the store has a lot more sugar,” she said. “We should still follow the dietary guidelines to avoid too much sugar and too much saturated fat.”

Other studies have found that drinking tea may provide other health benefits as well, such as reducing the risk of lung, ovarian, prostate, or colorectal cancer. But the results have been mixed. Other studies have found that drinking several cups of black tea per day can increase the risk of breast cancer, and one study found that drinking extremely hot tea can increase the risk of esophageal cancer.

“Findings for cancer have been more mixed,” Inoue-Choi said. ‘There have been more consistent results for [reduced risks of] heart disease or stroke.”

For now, she said, drinking tea appears beneficial, but scientists wouldn’t likely tell people to change their behavior or give recommendations about the ideal amount of tea to drink.

“We wouldn’t recommend people change their tea intake solely based on this single study,” Inoue-Choi said.

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Heart Attack: Indian Research Study Reveals Key Causes



International Desk
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photo: collected

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Heart attacks comprise the majority of the deaths which are caused due to cardiovascular diseases. As per the estimates of the World Health Organisation (WHO), around 18 million lives are lost every year due to heart related diseases.

This draws our attention towards understanding the key causes behind this fatal disease.

A research study conducted by Indian researchers has found the prominent reasons for heart attacks. "Prevalence of coronary artery disease (CAD) in India is progressively increasing as shown by data that cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) were accountable for 28.1% of total deaths and 14.1% of total disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) in 2016, compared to 15.2% and 6.9%, respectively, in 1990," the study report says.

The study titled "Metabolic risk factors in first acute coronary syndrome (MERIFACS) Study" is published in the Indian Heart Journal.

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Amaya Food Gallery Debuts New Express Lunch Menu with a Twist



News Desk, Barta24.com
Amaya Food Gallery Debuts New Express Lunch Menu with a Twist

Amaya Food Gallery Debuts New Express Lunch Menu with a Twist

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Located in level 13, Amaya Food Gallery has launched a new lunch menufeaturing a special four-course set menu for lunch. The price of the Quick Business Lunch is BDT 1250 NET, which will include all the vat and service charge. The restaurant is traditionally known for its handcrafted Asian signatures, but this new menu is sure to make a lasting impression with guests. The new set menu ranges from Asian items and a four course menu to mouth-watering entrees in which fresh and all-natural ingredients take center stage.

The new menu boasts a variety of Asian food to sample, share, or have all to yourself and has changed with the season in order to make sure that the restaurant can have the freshest food to enjoy. Kung Pao Chicken is one of the many items on the menu. It is for those who enjoy eating BBQ chicken. Chicken lovers can also order a half-spit-roasted chicken with pita bread. Paneer makhani with naan bread and steamed fish with lime chili and ginger are also options. All of these are the main courses on the lunch menu.

Beetroot carpaccio, som tum salad, red cabbage and pineapple slaw, and wakame salad are all delicious salad options.

The most frequently served starter at mealtimes is soup. The corn egg drop, tomato shorba, yammy tom yum gai, and cream of mushroom soup are all served at Amaya Food Gallery. If you're looking for the true flavors of Asian cuisine, you must try it.

The desserts are one of the other additions to the lunch set menu. Fruit salad, Patishapta Pitha, ice cream, and chocolate brownies.

Amaya Food Gallery has won the World Luxury Restaurant 2021 awards in the culinary segment and has created a noteworthy name for itself. Head Chef Monir has always been part of the team in their journey towards achieving this formidable culinary feat. In thewords of the restaurant's Christopher Baker, GM of Amari Dhaka, "a place to dine when you want upscale food without the pressure of dining to match. Chef Monir does a phenomenal job of creating unique dishes that utilize fresh local ingredients.

Chef Monir says, "I love having the opportunity to make the quick lunch for our diners a chance to taste the passion put into our dishes, especially on a day of such love and togetherness." He further adds to his comment by saying, "Our goal at Amaya Food Gallery is to allow diners to experience the many flavours offered on our menu and keep the price affordable."

Reservations are required to be made at the restaurant, which emphasizes a casual and upscale dining experience. The restaurant is able to accommodate up to 130 people indoors and 20 people outdoors. For any queries, please call 01777796444, 01777796445.

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The Henley Passport Index



News Desk, Baeta24.com
The Henley Passport Index

The Henley Passport Index

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Japanese passport holders have the greatest freedom to travel of any nationality, according to the latest edition of the Henley Passport Index.

The Japanese document allows travelers to visit 193 destinations without prior authorization needed, closely followed in second place by South Korea and Singapore with 192 each.

The United States ranks a joint seventh on the list (186 destinations), while Afghanistan ranks in last place with just 27 destinations allowing easy passage.

The Henley Passport Index is the original, authoritative ranking of all the world’s passports according to the number of destinations their holders can access without a prior visa. The index is based on exclusive data from the International Air Transport Association (IATA) – the largest, most accurate travel information database – and enhanced by Henley & Partners’ research team.

Expert insights regarding the latest ranking are available in the Global Mobility Report 2022 Q3.

With historical data spanning 17 years, the Henley Passport Index is the only one of its kind based on exclusive data from the International Air Transport Authority (IATA). The index includes 199 different passports and 227 different travel destinations.

Updated quarterly, the Henley Passport Index is considered the standard reference tool for global citizens and sovereign states when assessing where a passport ranks on the global mobility spectrum.

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