Heart Attack: Indian Research Study Reveals Key Causes



International Desk
photo: collected

photo: collected

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Heart attacks comprise the majority of the deaths which are caused due to cardiovascular diseases. As per the estimates of the World Health Organisation (WHO), around 18 million lives are lost every year due to heart related diseases.

This draws our attention towards understanding the key causes behind this fatal disease.

A research study conducted by Indian researchers has found the prominent reasons for heart attacks. "Prevalence of coronary artery disease (CAD) in India is progressively increasing as shown by data that cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) were accountable for 28.1% of total deaths and 14.1% of total disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) in 2016, compared to 15.2% and 6.9%, respectively, in 1990," the study report says.

The study titled "Metabolic risk factors in first acute coronary syndrome (MERIFACS) Study" is published in the Indian Heart Journal.

Drinking Tea Could Lower Risk of Diabetes, Stroke



News Desk, Barta24.com
Drinking Tea Could Lower Risk of Diabetes, Stroke

Drinking Tea Could Lower Risk of Diabetes, Stroke

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Several recent studies have suggested that drinking several cups of tea per day could lower the risk of diabetes, heart disease, and stroke.

The latest study indicates that drinking four cups of black, green, or oolong tea per day can lower the risk of developing type 2 diabetes by 17% over a decade. The research will be presented next week at the European Association for the Study of Diabetes annual conference.

“Our results are exciting because they suggest that people can do something as simple as drinking four cups of tea a day to potentially lessen their risk of developing type 2 diabetes,” Xiaying Li, a researcher at Wuhan University of Science and Technology, told NBC News.

Li and colleagues reviewed 19 studies, which included more than 1 million adults across 8 countries. They found that the benefits of drinking tea went up as someone drank more cups. For one to three cups per day, for instance, the risk of type 2 diabetes dropped by 4%. The percentages increased from there.

In another study published last month, researchers found that drinking two or more cups of black tea per day lowered the overall risk of death by 9% to 13% among 498,000 people in the U.K. during a 14-year period, as compared with those who drank no tea. The study also found a link between drinking multiple cups of tea per day and a lower risk of heart disease and stroke.

“We think our findings will be very reassuring to people who are already drinking tea,” Maki Inoue-Choi, PhD, a staff scientist at the National Cancer Institute, told NBC News.

Even among those who drank more than 10 cups of tea per day, “we didn’t see any negative effects on mortality risk,” she said.

The health benefits could stem from the polyphenols in tea, which are natural compounds in plants that provide antioxidants and may decrease inflammation, Inoue-Choi noted. Reducing inflammation can lower the risk of developing health conditions such as heart disease.

In green tea, the dominant polyphenols are called catechins, which can protect cells from damage, NBC News reported. When green tea leaves are fermented to make black tea, the catechins convert to theaflavins, which provide another form of antioxidants.

Inoue-Choi said she and colleagues found that adding milk or sugar to tea didn’t reduce the health benefits. But she noted that the participants tended to use those ingredients sparingly.

“The sweetened tea from the store has a lot more sugar,” she said. “We should still follow the dietary guidelines to avoid too much sugar and too much saturated fat.”

Other studies have found that drinking tea may provide other health benefits as well, such as reducing the risk of lung, ovarian, prostate, or colorectal cancer. But the results have been mixed. Other studies have found that drinking several cups of black tea per day can increase the risk of breast cancer, and one study found that drinking extremely hot tea can increase the risk of esophageal cancer.

“Findings for cancer have been more mixed,” Inoue-Choi said. ‘There have been more consistent results for [reduced risks of] heart disease or stroke.”

For now, she said, drinking tea appears beneficial, but scientists wouldn’t likely tell people to change their behavior or give recommendations about the ideal amount of tea to drink.

“We wouldn’t recommend people change their tea intake solely based on this single study,” Inoue-Choi said.

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Amaya Food Gallery Debuts New Express Lunch Menu with a Twist



News Desk, Barta24.com
Amaya Food Gallery Debuts New Express Lunch Menu with a Twist

Amaya Food Gallery Debuts New Express Lunch Menu with a Twist

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Located in level 13, Amaya Food Gallery has launched a new lunch menufeaturing a special four-course set menu for lunch. The price of the Quick Business Lunch is BDT 1250 NET, which will include all the vat and service charge. The restaurant is traditionally known for its handcrafted Asian signatures, but this new menu is sure to make a lasting impression with guests. The new set menu ranges from Asian items and a four course menu to mouth-watering entrees in which fresh and all-natural ingredients take center stage.

The new menu boasts a variety of Asian food to sample, share, or have all to yourself and has changed with the season in order to make sure that the restaurant can have the freshest food to enjoy. Kung Pao Chicken is one of the many items on the menu. It is for those who enjoy eating BBQ chicken. Chicken lovers can also order a half-spit-roasted chicken with pita bread. Paneer makhani with naan bread and steamed fish with lime chili and ginger are also options. All of these are the main courses on the lunch menu.

Beetroot carpaccio, som tum salad, red cabbage and pineapple slaw, and wakame salad are all delicious salad options.

The most frequently served starter at mealtimes is soup. The corn egg drop, tomato shorba, yammy tom yum gai, and cream of mushroom soup are all served at Amaya Food Gallery. If you're looking for the true flavors of Asian cuisine, you must try it.

The desserts are one of the other additions to the lunch set menu. Fruit salad, Patishapta Pitha, ice cream, and chocolate brownies.

Amaya Food Gallery has won the World Luxury Restaurant 2021 awards in the culinary segment and has created a noteworthy name for itself. Head Chef Monir has always been part of the team in their journey towards achieving this formidable culinary feat. In thewords of the restaurant's Christopher Baker, GM of Amari Dhaka, "a place to dine when you want upscale food without the pressure of dining to match. Chef Monir does a phenomenal job of creating unique dishes that utilize fresh local ingredients.

Chef Monir says, "I love having the opportunity to make the quick lunch for our diners a chance to taste the passion put into our dishes, especially on a day of such love and togetherness." He further adds to his comment by saying, "Our goal at Amaya Food Gallery is to allow diners to experience the many flavours offered on our menu and keep the price affordable."

Reservations are required to be made at the restaurant, which emphasizes a casual and upscale dining experience. The restaurant is able to accommodate up to 130 people indoors and 20 people outdoors. For any queries, please call 01777796444, 01777796445.

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The Henley Passport Index



News Desk, Baeta24.com
The Henley Passport Index

The Henley Passport Index

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Japanese passport holders have the greatest freedom to travel of any nationality, according to the latest edition of the Henley Passport Index.

The Japanese document allows travelers to visit 193 destinations without prior authorization needed, closely followed in second place by South Korea and Singapore with 192 each.

The United States ranks a joint seventh on the list (186 destinations), while Afghanistan ranks in last place with just 27 destinations allowing easy passage.

The Henley Passport Index is the original, authoritative ranking of all the world’s passports according to the number of destinations their holders can access without a prior visa. The index is based on exclusive data from the International Air Transport Association (IATA) – the largest, most accurate travel information database – and enhanced by Henley & Partners’ research team.

Expert insights regarding the latest ranking are available in the Global Mobility Report 2022 Q3.

With historical data spanning 17 years, the Henley Passport Index is the only one of its kind based on exclusive data from the International Air Transport Authority (IATA). The index includes 199 different passports and 227 different travel destinations.

Updated quarterly, the Henley Passport Index is considered the standard reference tool for global citizens and sovereign states when assessing where a passport ranks on the global mobility spectrum.

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Tourism in the digital era



Sujeev Shakya
Photo: Collected

Photo: Collected

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Tourism is a social, cultural and economic phenomenon which entails the movement of people to countries or places outside their usual environment for personal or business/professional purposes.

When we talked about promoting tourism, it was that opportunity of being able to be at ITB Berlin or WTM London. It was about physically being there with brochures, like selling your wares at the weekend market or village haat. People swing by your stall; you try to sell your wares based on the promo materials you have, and then rely on them to be able to send you a group of tourists.

The digital world has brought about many disruptions. You can book your tickets, hotels, tours and everything you would like to do online. Portals like Trip Advisor give you reviews to decide which destinations to look out for, and which products and services. The world of Instagram and TikTok has allowed you to view destinations, products and services from people you believe in and created tremendous peer pressure. Then there are internet entertainment platforms like Netflix where you can, apart from movies and innumerable series, gain access to many high quality documentaries and other materials that can make you think about different destinations you have never dreamt about.

New dimension

The last decade has changed how people view travel and choose what and where they eat, drink or carry out leisure activities. The pandemic has also added a new dimension where people travelled virtually during times of lockdown and restricted movements, and made some bucket lists for physical trips. Of course, there are the influencers, anyone with a device who can show you a whole new world you have never imagined.

In Kathmandu, with diverse speakers at a Neftalk organised by the Nepal Economic Forum, we discussed what is happening to tourism in the digital era and explored the disruptions and opportunities. There are three things to look out for.

First, there are new mediums that drive people’s travel decisions. For instance, the success of 14 Peaks: Nothing Is Impossible, a Netflix production with Nims Purja climbing all 14 eight-thousanders, triggered the imagination of many people, which was reflected in tourist arrivals to Nepal. Globally, people who have watched local content are 2.4 times more likely to make the place their #1 travel destination. Similarly, the video around the visit of the Prince of Bahrain and a vlogger from Qatar during the pandemic has let people in the Middle East who thought of Europe and the United States as premium destinations start to think about Nepal. At a luxury hotel in Pokhara, I was asked by a couple from the United Arab Emirates as to why we do not have $1,500 a night hotels as there would be lots from their country who would be interested.

Second, domestic tourism, which has been the bread and butter of many destinations in Nepal, has just exploded due to digital mediums. We hardly saw any sustained campaigns from any agency to lure local tourists, but then vloggers posting their bike ride videos on YouTube, Instagram and now TikTok have changed the fate of Nepali domestic tourism. People like Sisan Bainya have taken production quality seriously, and people want to follow him to the places he and his team have been.

Imagine Nepal is capturing such imagination of Nepali travellers. With a diaspora population of over 5 million, excluding India, across 180 countries, we will see a considerable demand surge from Nepalis visiting for religious or social purposes or just embarking on pure fun! For the domestic tourists, with the easing of payments through digital platforms, it’s all digital. Be it finding a destination, making bookings, paying for it, writing reviews and then posting about your trip. With more women joining the workforce, nuclear families and the concept of holidays not being limited to playing cards and drinking will significantly increase domestic tourism growth.

Third, the biggest challenge for Nepal to manage would be to ensure tourism has sustainable growth. The littering of trekking trails with cans of alcoholic beverages, bottles of aerated drinks and many other packaging materials is a huge issue. Structures are mushrooming everywhere to house travellers without proper planning. Everest is a golden goose we are killing by selling it too cheap. We have to think of the destination as super high-end. With a fragile ecology and biodiversity, we need to conserve; we need to use the same digital platforms to spread messages on pushing sustainable tourism. We have the commitments we made at COP26 to remember and the government’s Green Resilient Inclusive Development Action Plan to bear in mind.

Virtual reality

Finally, we need to prepare for tourists who will want to get to Nepal without actually getting to Nepal. With virtual reality and augmented reality becoming the future, with the Metaverse becoming the future real estate, we need to be there. We need to exploit these platforms to attract more people coming in person. We need to create that buzz of a destination that people will yearn to visit as we are one of the most photogenic countries in the world.

For all this to be leveraged, we need it to be private sector-led and come out of the shells of cartels, and we need the government to continue to provide a legislative and regulatory environment that facilitates these developments rather than thinking of stifling them in the name of controls. In many countries, governments have relied on self-regulation as a governance model. This is mainly due to the unique features of online content. Technology allows an individual to make an informed decision about how, when and what content they consume. We have missed many previous waves of disruptions, this one, we should not.

courtesy: The kathmandu post

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