Asia’s 10 Best Restaurants



Lifestyle Desk, Barta24.com
Asia’s 10 Best Restaurants

Asia’s 10 Best Restaurants

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From authentic Thai to European inspired recipes with an Asian twist, these restaurants excel at delivering culinary encounters that aren’t easily forgotten.

As the hospitality industry continues to bounce back from the restrictions of the last two years, Asia’s best chefs and restaurant owners look forward to sharing their hyper-seasonal creations with the global food community once again.

Since launching 10 years ago, Asia’s 50 Best Restaurants – sponsored by S.Pellegrino and Acqua Panna – recently unveiled its prestigious list for 2022. With Japan in the lead, closely followed by Thailand and Singapore, boasting the most entries, this year’s winner was Tokyo’s Den.

In previous years Den, conceived by chef Zaiyu Hasegawa, ranked consistently high as Japan’s voted best restaurant every year since 2018. Renowned for its playfulness, Hasegawa’s dishes are a perfect marriage of contemporary meets traditional Japanese cuisine, of which the Dentucky Fried Chicken is a prime example.

Chefs, restaurateurs, industry VIPs and the media were brought together across three different events in Bangkok, Macau and Tokyo to celebrate the top 50 chefs in Asia.

“In its 10th year, Asia’s 50 Best Restaurants proudly continues the tradition of rewarding culinary excellence and guiding diners to the most unique gastronomic experiences across the continent,” explains William Drew, Director of Content for Asia’s 50 Best Restaurants.

Get ready as we take you behind the scenes of the top culinary destinations in Asia and examine the philosophies and experiences underpinning the success of each chef.

1. Den, Tokyo

While growing up, Owner and Chef at Den, Zaiyu Hasegawa became fascinated by traditional Japanese cuisine. As a geisha his mum would bring home Bento for him from the ryotei (fine dining restaurant) where she worked.

While Hasegawa’s career began in one of these exclusive restaurants, Den’s philosophy is more of an elevated expression of Japanese home cooking. While the menu coincides with the changing seasons, the restaurant is renowned for its chicken wings, signature salad, snow crab tofu glazed with mizore sauce and donabe-gohan – rice heated in an earthen pot and paired with wagyu beef or seafood.

“Thanks to the support of producers, the vegetables we use are grown without pesticides or chemical fertilisers. Our specialty salad expresses our connection to farmers and is a fun way for diners to see what came out of the garden,” Hasegawa says.

In 2019 Den was also recognised for its heart-warming hospitality, earning the Art of Hospitality Award at The World’s 50 Best Restaurants.

2. Sorn, Bangkok

Sorn’s Head Chef Supaksorn Jongsiri became deeply inspired by southern Thai cuisine from his grandmother. His menu today is not only bursting with flavour and encompasses the cultural diversity of the South, but each dish is served at the right temperature – introducing a unique element to Thai cuisine.

If you’re lucky enough to secure a reservation at Sorn you can expect a one-of-a-kind service you’d be hard-pressed to find elsewhere. Staff are specially trained to delight guests with stories of Jongsiri’s vision and memories that inform each dish.

Combining the most highly-prized parts of a crab and coated in crab roe paste, Kan Chu Piang – gems on crab stick – is arguably a winning dish whose flavour is enhanced by piquant orange chilli sauce.

3. Florilège, Tokyo

If you’re looking for an experience that goes beyond the everyday Florilège is likely to pique your interest. With innovative French cuisine openly prepared for all eyes to see, Chef Hiroyasu Kawate provides a rare encounter for guests who desire a more transparent sensory experience.

With ingredients sourced locally and seasonally, Kawate’s dishes are imbued with a distinct Japanese quality. The restaurant specialises in preparing meals with sophisticated techniques that are served in Japanese style plates and bowls.

4. Le Du, Bangkok

A seemingly French name, Le Du in fact derived from the Thai word for ‘season’. Thitid Tassanakajohn, a master chef and restaurant empire builder co-founded the restaurant around the concept of regional Thai cooking with a French twist.

Trained in the US, Tassanakajohn’s menu showcases the finest local and seasonal ingredients, which are combined with modern cooking techniques. Le Du’s wines are sourced from around the globe and are carefully selected by Tassanakajohn who’s also a certified sommelier.

While Le Du’s menu is constantly changing, there is one dish Khao kluk kapi – river prawn paired with brown rice risotto and shrimp paste – that is synonymous with the restaurant and what it stands for.

5. The Chairman, Hong Kong

The Chairman was the first restaurant in Hong Kong to earn the prestigious title of The Best Restaurant in Asia, and for good reason. While the menu is contemporary, tradition and seasonal fresh ingredients play an important role in continuing the legacy of Cantonese cuisine.

Rare delicacies from southern China, including 20-year-old pickled lemon, sugar-roasted chrysanthemum and mini water crabs are procured from the most remote villages in China.

A favourite is undoubtedly the steamed flowery crab served with Chinese wine, clam juice and flat rice noodles.

6. La Chime, Osaka

La Cime, meaning summit in French, sets the bar high when it comes to delivering classic cuisine expressed through modern cooking techniques. Its star chef Yusuke Takada began his culinary career in Lyon and later worked in Osaka and Paris.

Our childhood memories can be one of the greatest sources of inspiration and for Takada the small island in southern Japan in which he grew up informs his recipes today.

With a flair for rare flavour combinations, Takada’s angler fish liver is served with persimmon and green onion, and for vegetarians the sea cucumber paired with turnip and starflower is a must.

7. Sühring, Bangkok

Nestled in a serene setting in the heart of Bangkok, the Sühring brothers Thomas and Mathias established a restaurant that is more akin to a house with several dining spaces to choose from.

With a wealth of international experience under their belt, the duo embarked on a fresh re-interpretation of traditional German gastronomy prepared to the standard of haute cuisine. With an array of fresh produce and seafood on their doorstep, the pair include crayfish, blue lobster and butternut squash on the menu.

Guests can expect a relaxed yet sophisticated encounter in a 1970s villa complete with a lush garden and open kitchen to observe the chefs bringing their creations to life.

8. Odette, Singapore

This year Odette, located in Singapore’s National Gallery, once again ranked high in Asia’s 50 Best Restaurants list, as it has done in the past few years. As the recipient of the highly coveted Gin Mare Art of Hospitality Award, this year Odette has proven itself as the ultimate destination to enjoy modern French cuisine in an artistic setting infused with genuine hospitality.

“I owe everything that I am to my family, especially my grandmother, Odette. She showed me how the most remarkable dishes can come from the purest ingredients and taught me the importance of adding that ‘little something’ to create dishes that excite the palate and fill the heart,” explains Julien Royer, Chef and Owner of Odette.

Boutique producers around the world supply the finest ingredients to bring signature dishes – Normandy brown crab and pepper-crusted pigeon – to life with attention to seasonality and terroir.

9. Neighborhood, Hong Kong

A hidden laneway teeming with markets, local bars and antique shops is an unusual setting in which to establish a gourmet restaurant. Although fully booked, Chef and Owner David Lai doesn’t rely on a polished website or instagram account to entice people into tasting his simple French cooking.

Lai worked in exclusive high-end restaurants in both Hong Kong and San Francisco before adopting the ‘slow food’ philosophy of Alice Waters that he came across while completing his studies in California.

At Neighborhood lamb sourced from the Pyrenees, local seafood and wild game can be found on the specials menu, which always reflect the current season.

10. Nusara, Bangkok

Chef Thitid Tassanakajohn, of Le Du, pays homage to his grandmother Nusara with a menu that re-visits family recipes.

From the 12-course tasting menu the spicy squid salad and wok-fried wagyu beef topped with basil lead into the heartier crab curry served in a betel leaf.

While the second floor seats 10 in a room that has an intimate atmosphere from another era, the ground floor is home to a chic bar serving beverages that have Tassanakajohn’s stamp of approval, as a certified sommelier.

Drinking Tea Could Lower Risk of Diabetes, Stroke



News Desk, Barta24.com
Drinking Tea Could Lower Risk of Diabetes, Stroke

Drinking Tea Could Lower Risk of Diabetes, Stroke

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Several recent studies have suggested that drinking several cups of tea per day could lower the risk of diabetes, heart disease, and stroke.

The latest study indicates that drinking four cups of black, green, or oolong tea per day can lower the risk of developing type 2 diabetes by 17% over a decade. The research will be presented next week at the European Association for the Study of Diabetes annual conference.

“Our results are exciting because they suggest that people can do something as simple as drinking four cups of tea a day to potentially lessen their risk of developing type 2 diabetes,” Xiaying Li, a researcher at Wuhan University of Science and Technology, told NBC News.

Li and colleagues reviewed 19 studies, which included more than 1 million adults across 8 countries. They found that the benefits of drinking tea went up as someone drank more cups. For one to three cups per day, for instance, the risk of type 2 diabetes dropped by 4%. The percentages increased from there.

In another study published last month, researchers found that drinking two or more cups of black tea per day lowered the overall risk of death by 9% to 13% among 498,000 people in the U.K. during a 14-year period, as compared with those who drank no tea. The study also found a link between drinking multiple cups of tea per day and a lower risk of heart disease and stroke.

“We think our findings will be very reassuring to people who are already drinking tea,” Maki Inoue-Choi, PhD, a staff scientist at the National Cancer Institute, told NBC News.

Even among those who drank more than 10 cups of tea per day, “we didn’t see any negative effects on mortality risk,” she said.

The health benefits could stem from the polyphenols in tea, which are natural compounds in plants that provide antioxidants and may decrease inflammation, Inoue-Choi noted. Reducing inflammation can lower the risk of developing health conditions such as heart disease.

In green tea, the dominant polyphenols are called catechins, which can protect cells from damage, NBC News reported. When green tea leaves are fermented to make black tea, the catechins convert to theaflavins, which provide another form of antioxidants.

Inoue-Choi said she and colleagues found that adding milk or sugar to tea didn’t reduce the health benefits. But she noted that the participants tended to use those ingredients sparingly.

“The sweetened tea from the store has a lot more sugar,” she said. “We should still follow the dietary guidelines to avoid too much sugar and too much saturated fat.”

Other studies have found that drinking tea may provide other health benefits as well, such as reducing the risk of lung, ovarian, prostate, or colorectal cancer. But the results have been mixed. Other studies have found that drinking several cups of black tea per day can increase the risk of breast cancer, and one study found that drinking extremely hot tea can increase the risk of esophageal cancer.

“Findings for cancer have been more mixed,” Inoue-Choi said. ‘There have been more consistent results for [reduced risks of] heart disease or stroke.”

For now, she said, drinking tea appears beneficial, but scientists wouldn’t likely tell people to change their behavior or give recommendations about the ideal amount of tea to drink.

“We wouldn’t recommend people change their tea intake solely based on this single study,” Inoue-Choi said.

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Heart Attack: Indian Research Study Reveals Key Causes



International Desk
photo: collected

photo: collected

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Heart attacks comprise the majority of the deaths which are caused due to cardiovascular diseases. As per the estimates of the World Health Organisation (WHO), around 18 million lives are lost every year due to heart related diseases.

This draws our attention towards understanding the key causes behind this fatal disease.

A research study conducted by Indian researchers has found the prominent reasons for heart attacks. "Prevalence of coronary artery disease (CAD) in India is progressively increasing as shown by data that cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) were accountable for 28.1% of total deaths and 14.1% of total disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) in 2016, compared to 15.2% and 6.9%, respectively, in 1990," the study report says.

The study titled "Metabolic risk factors in first acute coronary syndrome (MERIFACS) Study" is published in the Indian Heart Journal.

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Amaya Food Gallery Debuts New Express Lunch Menu with a Twist



News Desk, Barta24.com
Amaya Food Gallery Debuts New Express Lunch Menu with a Twist

Amaya Food Gallery Debuts New Express Lunch Menu with a Twist

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Located in level 13, Amaya Food Gallery has launched a new lunch menufeaturing a special four-course set menu for lunch. The price of the Quick Business Lunch is BDT 1250 NET, which will include all the vat and service charge. The restaurant is traditionally known for its handcrafted Asian signatures, but this new menu is sure to make a lasting impression with guests. The new set menu ranges from Asian items and a four course menu to mouth-watering entrees in which fresh and all-natural ingredients take center stage.

The new menu boasts a variety of Asian food to sample, share, or have all to yourself and has changed with the season in order to make sure that the restaurant can have the freshest food to enjoy. Kung Pao Chicken is one of the many items on the menu. It is for those who enjoy eating BBQ chicken. Chicken lovers can also order a half-spit-roasted chicken with pita bread. Paneer makhani with naan bread and steamed fish with lime chili and ginger are also options. All of these are the main courses on the lunch menu.

Beetroot carpaccio, som tum salad, red cabbage and pineapple slaw, and wakame salad are all delicious salad options.

The most frequently served starter at mealtimes is soup. The corn egg drop, tomato shorba, yammy tom yum gai, and cream of mushroom soup are all served at Amaya Food Gallery. If you're looking for the true flavors of Asian cuisine, you must try it.

The desserts are one of the other additions to the lunch set menu. Fruit salad, Patishapta Pitha, ice cream, and chocolate brownies.

Amaya Food Gallery has won the World Luxury Restaurant 2021 awards in the culinary segment and has created a noteworthy name for itself. Head Chef Monir has always been part of the team in their journey towards achieving this formidable culinary feat. In thewords of the restaurant's Christopher Baker, GM of Amari Dhaka, "a place to dine when you want upscale food without the pressure of dining to match. Chef Monir does a phenomenal job of creating unique dishes that utilize fresh local ingredients.

Chef Monir says, "I love having the opportunity to make the quick lunch for our diners a chance to taste the passion put into our dishes, especially on a day of such love and togetherness." He further adds to his comment by saying, "Our goal at Amaya Food Gallery is to allow diners to experience the many flavours offered on our menu and keep the price affordable."

Reservations are required to be made at the restaurant, which emphasizes a casual and upscale dining experience. The restaurant is able to accommodate up to 130 people indoors and 20 people outdoors. For any queries, please call 01777796444, 01777796445.

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The Henley Passport Index



News Desk, Baeta24.com
The Henley Passport Index

The Henley Passport Index

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Japanese passport holders have the greatest freedom to travel of any nationality, according to the latest edition of the Henley Passport Index.

The Japanese document allows travelers to visit 193 destinations without prior authorization needed, closely followed in second place by South Korea and Singapore with 192 each.

The United States ranks a joint seventh on the list (186 destinations), while Afghanistan ranks in last place with just 27 destinations allowing easy passage.

The Henley Passport Index is the original, authoritative ranking of all the world’s passports according to the number of destinations their holders can access without a prior visa. The index is based on exclusive data from the International Air Transport Association (IATA) – the largest, most accurate travel information database – and enhanced by Henley & Partners’ research team.

Expert insights regarding the latest ranking are available in the Global Mobility Report 2022 Q3.

With historical data spanning 17 years, the Henley Passport Index is the only one of its kind based on exclusive data from the International Air Transport Authority (IATA). The index includes 199 different passports and 227 different travel destinations.

Updated quarterly, the Henley Passport Index is considered the standard reference tool for global citizens and sovereign states when assessing where a passport ranks on the global mobility spectrum.

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